Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2009

The training event has happened. And now you’re left wondering – will they remember it? Will the learning be applied? How can this be reinforced over time?

We can help.

Impactiviti’s Preferred Partner network includes a company with a uniquely useful offering – a template-driven tool that allows you to create mini-scenarios (1-3 minutes), which can be e-mailed. These quick hit reinforcement and application exercises are perfect for follow-up to training, and the back-end analytics allow you to see where the gaps and successes are. These simple and compelling mini-bytes can be deployed at any time (pre-event also)!

If this type of offering is what you’re looking for, contact Steve Woodruff at Impactiviti. We’ll introduce you to an optimal vendor/partner with a proven track record of success.

(And, if you’re in need of a robust and engaging on-line testing and assessment service, we know where you need to turn for that also!)

—––

Impactiviti is a consultancy focused on helping companies identify optimal partners for training/marketing needs. This vendor/client “matchmaking” service is provided free of charge to client companies (preferred partners pay a referral fee when a new business relationship is established).

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via e-mail

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via RSS

(Image credit)

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

I was recently asked, by a pharmaceutical client, what was “new” and leading-edge in training.

trends1I haven’t seen a lot of specific programs or approaches that struck me as the latest-and-greatest must-haves, but there are certain social and technology trends that will profoundly impact training in the years to come. Here are a handful that I think are important:

1. Who – specifically, from whom will we get our knowledge, coaching, and support? I believe that the formal, centralized model of training will increasingly be displaced by social, peer-to-peer networking and resourcing on the job. New platforms are now emerging, combining elements of learning management, knowledge management, content management, and social networking, including such features as wikis, blogs, and micro-sharing (peer-to-peer messaging). People are now getting used to learning from one another via networking, and this will (should!) shape training approaches in the years to come.

Example: Pfizer’s Pfizerpedia project. Pfizer researchers creating a living wiki that is peer-to-peer driven. See Karl Kapp’s overview (with more helpful links); a .pdf case study; article from Information Week.

2. When – these days, with the one-click-away Google, presence apps like Twitter, and cell-phone connectivity, it’s all about the NOW. We’re getting used to finding what we need when we need it, and training will need to migrate increasingly to a Continuous Training Development / Continuous Learning Access / Constant Update / Immediate Equipping model. While there will always be some training content on the long development cycle slow train, we’re now entering a technology era where fingertip performance support is potentially ubiquitous.

Example: On-line coaching tools. For software apps and other needs, context-sensitive help & coaching, now including audio/video/screencasts, is being rolled out. This is far superior to sitting in a classroom for 5 days with fire-hose training, and a hope and a prayer that students will retain the material.

3. Where and How – With smart phones, notebook computers, Kindles, and who-knows-what-will-be-launched-next-month, information and communication are finally untethered. We can take pictures, chat, videoconference, blog, search, and listen anywhere and everywhere. Training will gladly hop aboard this fast-moving express. Multi-channel communications (podcasts, e-mail simulations, webcasts, videos) are being woven into daily life, and will increasingly shape training, as will the use of gaming environments and virtual worlds.

Example: One of my pharma clients recently rolled out laptops that included integrated webcams. This capability soon led to a new layer of productivity – pre-event training practice on selling skills that could be conducted “live” and at a distance, making the on-site training more efficient.

4. What – The era of personalized information experience is here, and is increasingly moving into training platforms. Anyone can set up an iGoogle or My Yahoo page and add information and application boxes, or customize widgets on Facebook pages, or set up RSS feeds around their own interests. As these technologies are embraced in training, whole new layers of efficient and customized training delivery become possible.

Example: Some Learning Management Systems are rolling out portal-like front-ends, which allow people to see customized training, resources, and information according to login. This trend will accelerate as personalized information delivery becomes the norm across all web technologies.

And now, one final trend that SHOULD be embraced – Strategic Design and development of training with a focus on operational efficiency. But that’s a whole separate topic…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

Teva aggressively seeking to “genericize” Merck‘s Singulair, Amgen‘s Neupogen.

Warren Buffet pulling back from pharma investments that contain 2 letters (P&G, J&J).

GSK‘s nausea drug Zofran may help with drug withdrawal symptomsGlaxoSmithKline Plc’s Zofran, approved to treat nausea and vomiting, appears to reduce symptoms of withdrawal from morphine, codeine, heroin, OxyContin and similar pain medicines, a study shows. The drug, which is now available as a generic called ondansetron, was used to treat eight men for morphine withdrawal, according to a study in the Journal of Pharmacogenetics and Genomics. Compared with placebo, the patients receiving ondansetron were less likely to experience anxiety, hot flashes, aches, restlessness, nausea and vomiting.

——

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via e-mail

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via RSS

Connect with Steve Woodruff

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

Ahhh, the politics of drug approval processes. Some sniping going on about who was and wasn’t included in the FDA review panel for prasugrel. No matter what choices you make, somebody’s going to paint a bulls-eye on your back. Just sayin’…

Promising new treatment for MDS (Celgene‘s Vidaza) – A new drug sharply improves the survival rate of patients with a bone-marrow disorder that often develops into acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), according to a study released Wednesday. Up until now, there has been no known treatment for the disorder — called myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) — besides bone-marrow transplant, which is suitable for only a small percentage of patients.

Merck and Novartis vie worldwide for top sales force honorsNew TNS Healthcare research shows that physicians in four out of the five major European countries — the UK, Germany, Spain and Italy — give Novartis top marks for effectively delivering key sales and service activities. Merck takes the top spot in the US and ties with Novartis in the UK and Germany. In 2008, Merck and Novartis tied for the top spot in the US, with the highest ratings across all service activities. This year, Merck pulls ahead in the US, with stronger ratings for both its Web-based physician services and its patient information programs.

——

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via e-mail

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via RSS

Connect with Steve Woodruff

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

J&J tops out Barron’s list of Best Companies, for 2nd year in a row.

Generic competitors awake to Sepracor‘s LunestaDrug maker Sepracor Inc. said two competitors have filed applications to produce and market generic versions of its blockbuster sleep aid Lunesta.

An interesting use of new web technologies: Medpedia launches - The Medpedia Project today announced the public launch of the beta version of a technology platform for the worldwide health community. Harvard Medical School, Stanford School of Medicine, Berkeley School of Public Health, University of Michigan Medical School and other leading global health organizations, are contributing in various ways to Medpedia. The goal of The Medpedia Project is to create a new model of how the world will assemble, maintain, critique and access medical knowledge. It will, over time, be a repository of up-to-date unbiased medical information, contributed and maintained by health experts around the world, and freely available to everyone.

——

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via e-mail

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via RSS

Connect with Steve Woodruff

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

Takeda gets approval for UloricTakeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc., announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ULORIC® (febuxostat) 40 mg and 80 mg for the chronic management of hyperuricemia in patients with gout. This once-daily, oral medication is the first new treatment option in more than 40 years for the more than five million patients who have hyperuricemia associated with gout.

Diabetes drug Byetta tanking.

New head of Sanofi (Viehbacher) applying lessons learned at GSK.

PLUS – my review of last week’s ePharma Summit, and a sum-up of some recent articles (with links) on pharma e-marketing/social media.

——

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via e-mail

Subscribe to the Impactiviti blog via RSS

Connect with Steve Woodruff

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

Last week I had the privilege of attending IIRUSA’s ePharma Summit in Philadelphia. If you missed my live-blogging posts, they are here: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday. (UPDATE – here is a summary post of pharma/social media issues, written for the MarketingProfs Daily Fix blog).

epharmaaud-smHere are some overall impressions of the event:

1. Organization of the event was excellent. Social media was used pre-event and during it to communicate and community-build. Planning and execution were smooth, things ran on time, and the inevitable little mid-course corrections were handled well. Each evening had a social mixer. There were plenty of opportunities to network. The organizers listened carefully to the Twitter back-channel talk about the need for more power outlets, and more afternoon coffee, and showed a readiness to learn and adapt.

2. The material in Day 1 (pre-event workshops) was a bit basic for my taste. And, there was an over-reliance on panel discussions during the conference. Needed a few more provocative and/or practical speakers showing case studies of what works, why, and how.

3. A couple presentations were off-base from the emphasis on eMarketing. Everyone who was there knows what I’m talking about.

4. As with all of these conferences over the years, there’s a lot of angst and risk-aversion regarding legal/regulatory issues. But that’s life in pharma-world. Baby steps are being taken. A growing number of people inside and just on the periphery of pharma companies “get it” and are pushing change.

5. The exhibits didn’t have anything too remarkable. But the massage booth sponsored by IMC2 was a very nice idea!

6. Attendance appeared to be about 250 or so during the two main conference days.

7. Josh Bernoff’s presentation was the best. The Wednesday afternoon overview of three award-winning marketing campaigns also was an audience favorite – there was some good stuff there.

8. For the panel in which I took part, regarding social media, I sought to underline the cultural aspects of social media communities, urging the marketers not to simply view these communication approaches as one more “tactic” aimed at a certain “demographic.” Hopefully, I didn’t come across too much as a Kool-Aid drinking idealist. I might have, though!

twittercorner9. About 6-8 of us (including the conference organizers) were live-Twittering during the conference, interacting with a virtual global audience throughout. There was a LOT of back-channel interaction going on – it was a snapshot of how social media will increasingly be wrapped into events.

10. The venue – Hyatt at Penn’s Landing – was quite pleasant.

This event, like every conference I’ve been to, had some room for improvement, but it was well-executed overall, and the organizers were eager to hear how things can be better for next time. That bodes well for future events. The best conferences always end with an exhausted smile. By that measure, the ePharma Summit was a success.

PLUS – here is a collection of recent links on the topic of pharma eMarketing – enjoy!

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 29 other followers